Return of the Squid

I had my fingers crossed my new technique of using live bait might be a little more effective at catching fish. I wasn’t getting any bites though. After waiting I began to get a few very gentle nibbles on my seaworm, but couldn’t get the hook to set. After being frustrated with this for a little while I pulled my bait up to see if it was still there, and a squid followed my seaworm out of the depths!

Unfortunately my squid jig was snagged on lobster pot recently, and consigned to the deep. I put 2 treble hooks on and a little pink lure because pink is a squid’s favorite color. Very soon after this I began really getting bites on my lure. It took a little bit of practice but eventually I managed to a hook a squid! I reeled him in until he broke the surface of the water and then he proceed to shoot a stream of ink straight up in the air over my head into the cockpit! What a mess.

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Soon I had another one, and I made sure this one let his ink go in the water before pulling him out of the water.

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As I was getting ready to turn this squid into calamari, I flipped him over on the cutting board and he changed colors! He went from a translucent white color to a red color. It happened very quickly and was quite a surprise.

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I eventually managed to catch one more squid, and we tried out the tempura batter recipe from our Ratios cookbook. They were very delicious.

2 thoughts on “Return of the Squid

  1. I’m really impressed. How to you remove the ink sack? Is the squid like a chameleon and changes color to match his background? Did the color go away? How curious.

  2. The squid had actually sprayed its ink in the water before I hauled it on board, so at least the ink sack was empty. After separating the “head” of the squid from the body, all of the insides just pulled out. It was really weird though, no blood and no mess. I think they do use their color changing as a way to blend in. The strangest part was that the skin continued changing colors long after it was cut up into little pieces and ready to cook.

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