Around the Boat Yard

At the boat yard, several rounds of Rummy were played and several movies watched between walking excursions and chatting with our neighbors.  Although Thunderbolt, GA was a pleasure to look at, the town had little to offer for antsy visitors.  We frequented Tubby’s where we enjoyed cold beers and tasty fare for reasonable prices.  IMG_6887

 

The nearby Bonaventure Cemetary proved a fantastic walking ground.  The eerie beauty of this historic cemetery has captured the creative interests of poets, authors, filmmakers, and the general public for years.  Throughout this 100 acre burial ground gardens and sculptures lie beneath a canopy of Spanish moss laden oaks.  We spent an afternoon here admiring. IMG_7010 It finally came time to say goodbye to BMac (even though I told him I was so pleased with a crew of 3 that I wouldn’t allow him to leave).  He hopped a flight from Savannah to Annapolis.  BMac plans to join us for a long weekend in the Bahamas with the airline credits that he has since we didn’t actually deliver him to the appropriate location.

Hinckley Boat Yard did not disappoint.  On the same day that our rebuilt fuel injector pump returned to the yard from the subcontractor, Bob had it re-installed on the Perkins.  Brian paid the bill, and after I scraped him up off the ground, we cast off from the dock and set out once more.  This time, destined for Thanksgiving…

Happy Thanksgiving!

Rode Trip cast off the dock lines from the Hinckley Boatyard, bound for Thanksgiving. Strong north winds were forecasted with accompanying cold temperatures and spotty rain showers. We would not travel offshore with that prediction, but were thankful for the ability to access the Intracoastal Waterway which would enable us to continue southward despite the foul weather. Oh, those north winds did blow! We set the jib and were able to sail along the Intracoastal route having traveled 103.9 nm (2 and 1/4 days) having used only 3 engine hours. What fun to sail the winding streams; with each twist and turn a jibe would result in either an upwind or downwind stretch. Passers-by actually photographed us! Had they never seen a sail boat sailing? Inside the Intracoastal there were no waves to slow our progress or knock us. The sailing was smooth and fast! Rode Trip blazed across open sounds. At one point, we were sailing with the jib and a double-reefed main sail and we passed by two other sailing boats, one larger and one smaller each flying sheeted-in jibs. Whee hoo! Take that from an ‘ol “wet-snail!” Shortly thereafter we dropped the main, but the thrill of our imaginary race urged us onward despite gusting winds and impending rain. Brian kept a close watch on the depth sounder as our only concern was running aground under sail. We had no issues with depth. Each night we dropped the hook we were exhausted but felt spectacular!

We’d returned to the memorable Cumberland Island, Georgia and thanks to our speedy travel were able to spend a few days enjoying the beauty and wildlife. We first anchored at the north end of the island on the Brickhill River – this river branches off the Cumberland River ICW route. Here, you can dinghy to the dock at Plum Orchard for access to the historical Carnegie winter vacation home as well as access to several hiking trails. The northern end of Cumberland is less popular, therefore less people and more animals!

20131125-142244.jpg
IMG_7034IMG_7036IMG_7047IMG_7055IMG_7057

The south end of Cumberland is frequented by passing cruisers. Here, you can dinghy to the ferry dock at Sea Camp for access to several hiking trails, the ruins of Carnegie winter vacation home Dungeness, a short walk to the beach, and silt piles (no longer top secret) worth sifting in search of shark teeth.

20131125-172133.jpgIMG_7091IMG_7086IMG_7082

Brian and I had a fabulous walk along the beach, through the forest, and paused at the silt piles to find three shark teeth. We spent time getting acquainted with two of our anchored neighbors, s/v Sea Bird and s/v C-Spirit. A most enjoyable day! Our respite at Cumberland Island had charged our energy for the coming holiday.

We departed, continuing south, and brought Rode Trip to her safe-keeping location so that we could travel for Thanksgiving. This year we’d spend Turkey Day feasting in the hills of San Francisco with the Grandjeans. It was a marvelous holiday and we have many, many reasons to be Thankful this year!

Sightseeing Savannah

The staff at the Hinckley Boatyard were fabulous! We’d like to thank Amy, Bob, Colin, and Nancy for making us feel right at home and accommodating our every need while we were stranded in “Maintenanceville”. But nobody really enjoys spending time at a boatyard, even a yard that has fabulous people. We had chosen Savannah because we’d never been there before and we were hoping to see the sights. During our first day at the dock, it was quite possibly the coldest day thus far this year by Georgia standards (the cold front we had out sailed had arrived). Bob stopped by bright and early to ask if we were warm enough, did we need to borrow a space heater? His keen, mechanical ear heard our forced hot air heater hard at work and we assured him that we were toasty warm below. How thoughtful! I think that we surprised Bob when we told him we were leaving our cozy cave and heading to Savannah for the day to explore.

A short taxi ride brought us into downtown Savannah. We began our day on River Street near the Visitors’ Center. We didn’t really have a plan, just to meander along the streets and see what we could find. Savannah is beautiful; streets are lined with towering oaks streaming with Spanish moss and brick homes whose intricate, ironwork enclosed balconies overhang above the streets. Scattered throughout the historical district are historical squares; these contain monuments, fountains, etc. as tributes to Savannah’s historical figures. We strolled through the squares, up side streets, down main streets, and along the river walk.

Savannah River

Savannah River

 

River Street

River Street

 

World War II Monument

World War II Monument

 

Greene Square - Maj.Gen. Nathaniel Greene Monument

Greene Square – Maj.Gen. Nathaniel Greene Monument

IMG_6911

Forsyth Park Fountain

Forsyth Park Fountain

Interactive Artwork at Forsyth Park

Interactive Artwork at Forsyth Park

 

Roseway Schooner

Roseway Schooner – this snowbird is “retired” from her home port of Rockland, ME.  She still looks fabulous ferrying tourists up the Savannah River.

 

1996 Olymic Monument

1996 Olymic Monument

 

Waving Girl Monument - lighthouse keeper's sister, Florence Martus, who for 44 years waved to ships in Savannah's port.

Waving Girl Monument – lighthouse keeper’s sister, Florence Martus, who for 44 years waved to ships in Savannah’s port.

It was COLD! Our scenic exploration soon became a pub crawl. Hey, that’s where the heat was, and we met some great people as we hopped from bar to bar sampling the local brews. Rumor has it that Savannah hosts quite the St. Paddy’s Day bash; just imagine walking the streets with to-go cups!

World of Beer...delicious!

World of Beer…delicious!

 

The Sons of LIberty

The Sons of LIberty were also out on the town,  but they weren’t spilling nearly as much beer as they had tea when they visited Boston.

Nothing like a few Irish tunes for a grand finale!
Nothing like a few Irish tunes for a grand finale!

We returned to the boatyard in the wee morning hours after a fantastic self-tour of Savannah.